News

New Program to Help Adults with Communication
Date:  1/17/2017
ArticleType:  Member News

For immediate release

NEW PROGRAM TO HELP ADULTS WITH COMMUNICATION DISABILITIES COMES TO DUNEDIN



Voices of Hope for Aphasia

2901 1st Avenue North, Suite 101

St. Petersburg, FL 33713

www.vohaphasia.org



Contact: Jackie Hinckley

Jackie@vohaphasia.org  

(727) 249-1953




St. Petersburg, FL, Tuesday, January 17, 2017: Voices of Hope for Aphasia, a nonprofit organization in St. Petersburg, is proud to announce the opening of a new program in Dunedin. The program is specially designed to serve adults with communication disabilities, like aphasia, that are a result of stroke or other neurological condition.

The new program will be offered at the Hale Senior Activity Center on Thursdays from 1:00 to 4:00 pm, beginning January 12, 2017. Specially trained staff lead conversation and activity groups with communication supports that allow those with disabilities to participate.

“One in 3 people who has a stroke will have a communication disability,” said Dr. Jackie Hinckley, Executive Director. “Once therapy and rehabilitation have ended, those individuals are likely to become isolated through loss of friends and relationships, and lack of meaningful activity. Our programs serve to rectify this problem by providing an outlet for the development of friendships. We help people get back to a meaningful life, by finding things that each person can do and contribute to the group.”

The “Living with Aphasia” program has been offered successfully at two different locations in St. Petersburg, the Sunshine Senior Center and USF St Petersburg. “We’re thrilled to be able to offer the program to those living in northern Pinellas county,” said Kathy Caputo, Co-Founder.

To reserve a space or get more information, please call 727-249-1953.

About:

Voices of Hope for Aphasia (www.vohaphasia.org) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization based in St. Petersburg, FL, that provides group and community programs for people with aphasia. The 2 million people in the United States who are living with aphasia experience the loss of the ability to understand, speak, read, or write. Individuals with aphasia have intact intelligence and are mentally competent, but have trouble finding the words they need to express themselves. The condition is similar to living in a country where you don’t speak the language.



For more information, go to: www.vohaphasia.org or call 727-249-1953.

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